Advancing the effective use of light for society and the environment.

Thursday, April 14, 2005

Daylighting Controls Focus of LRC’s Train-the-Trainer Session
Photo: The LRC's Andrew Bierman demonstrates daylighting techniques with the Daylighting Controls Simulator.
Andrew Bierman demonstrates daylighting techniques with the Daylighting Controls Simulator.

What should a daylight switching system do? What should a daylight dimming system do? Where should daylighting control systems measure daylight in a building? What is the difference between a closed-loop and an open-loop control system? These questions and many more are answered in the Daylighting Controls Practicum developed by the Daylight Dividends program.

Twelve lighting professionals, instructors and energy efficiency experts convened recently at a two-day, hands-on session at the Lighting Research Center. These trainers will offer the Daylighting Controls Practicum at various sites around the country. The LRC’s Andrew Bierman, Dan Frering, Terry Klein, Russ Leslie, and Peter Morante focused their training-session instruction on the design, selection and commissioning of today’s daylighting control systems.

The goals of the practicum are to train a range of lighting decision-makers to:

Photo: LRC researcher Terry Klein explains the Daylighting Controls Simulator while participants get hands-on practice with the equipment.
Terry Klein explains the Daylighting Controls Simulator while participants get hands-on practice.

  • successfully design daylighting control systems for a variety of space types
  • specify and select daylighting control products that will meet the objectives of the design
  • commission the system for effective operation
  • operate the system efficiently

Researchers at the LRC also developed a device to simulate a daylighting control system within a room. Dubbed simply the “Daylighting Controls Simulator,” this apparatus was designed to demonstrate the interaction between natural daylight and the major components of a daylighting control system—photocell, controller, ballast and power supply.

For more information about the Daylighting Controls Practicum offered in your area, contact one of the trainers below.


Dan Frering
Lighting Research Center
Troy, NY
(518) 687-7149
frerid@rpi.edu

Bill Burke
Pacific Gas & Electric
San Francisco, CA
(415) 973-9951
wxb0@pge.com

Sam Sam Fankhauser
Connecticut Light & Power
Hartford, CT
(860) 832-4750
fankhsr@nu.com

Curt Klaassen
Iowa Energy Center
Ankeny, IA
(515) 965-7055
curtk@energy.iastate.edu

Jeannine Komonosky
Pacific Gas & Electric
San Francisco, CA
(415) 973-8850
jfk4@pge.com

Chris Meek
UW Daylighting Lab
Seattle, WA
(206) 616-7014
cmeek@u.washington.edu

Kathleen Peake
The Lighting Collaborative
Tustin, CA
(714) 669-0835
kpeake@pacbell.net

Greg Sharp
Southern California Edison
Irwindale, CA
(626) 812-7368
gregory.sharp@sce.com

Dona Stankus, AIA
North Carolina Solar Center
Raleigh, NC
(919) 513-0307
dona_stankus@ncsu.edu

Eric Strandberg
Lighting Design Lab
Seattle, WA
(206) 325-9711 Ext. 28
eric@lightingdesignlab.com

Marsha Walton
New York State Energy Research
& Development Authority
Albany, NY
(518) 862-1090
mlw@nyserda.org

 

Daylight Dividends
The Daylight Dividends program is a national effort administered by the Lighting Research Center to educate and provide evidence, guidance, and perspectives supporting the use of daylighting in commercial and educational facilities. Program sponsors include California Energy Commission, Connecticut Light and Power Company, Iowa Energy Center, New York State Energy Research and Development Authority, North Carolina Daylighting Consortium, Northwest Energy Efficiency Alliance, and the U.S. Department of Energy.

About the LRC

The Lighting Research Center (LRC) is part of Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and is the leading university-based research center devoted to lighting. Founded in 1988, the Lighting Research Center has built an international reputation as a trusted and reliable source for objective information about lighting technologies, applications, and products. Its mission is to advance the effective use of light and create a positive legacy of change for society and the environment.



© 2005 Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY 12180 USA.

Rennselear Polytechnic Institute