Lighting Research Center Lighting Research Center
    Volume 7 Issue 3
May 2003    
beam angle - The angle at which luminous intensity is 50 percent of the maximum intensity. bin - To sort or classify light sources (such as light emitting diodes) into groups according to their luminous intensity or color appearance. conduction - The process of removing heat from an object via physical contact with other objects or materials, usually metals. convection - The process of removing heat from an object through the surrounding air. cosine distribution - A property of a light source such that its luminous intensity in a particular direction is proportional to the cosine of the angle from the normal to the source. driver - For light emitting diodes, a device that regulates the voltage and current powering the source. heat sinking - Adding a material, usually metal, adjacent to an object in order to cool it through conduction. illumination - The process of using light to see objects at a particular location. indication - The process of using a light source as something to be seen as in signaling. junction temperature - For light emitting diodes, the temperature of the light-emitting portion of the device (see PN junction), which is inversely correlated with its light output. lumen maintenance - The lumens produced by a light source at any given time during its operating life as a percentage of its lumens at the beginning of life. monochromatic - For light, consisting of a single wavelength and having a very saturated color. PN junction - For light emitting diodes, the portion of the device where positive and negative charges combine to produce light. pulse-width modulation - Operating a light source by very rapidly (faster than can be detected visually) switching it on and off to achieve intermediate values of average light output; the frequency and the duty cycle (percentage of time the source is switched on) are important parameters in the modulation. semiconductor - A material whose electrical conductivity is between that of a conductor and an insulator; the conductivity of most semiconductors is temperature dependent. spectral power distribution (SPD) - A representation of the radiant power emitted by a light source as a function of wavelength. substrate - For light emitting diodes, the material on which the devices are constructed. tri-phosphor - A mixture of three phosphors to convert ultraviolet radiation to visible light in fluorescent lamps; each of the phosphors emits light that is blue, green or red in appearance with the combination producing white light.

Abstract

This publication answers some commonly asked questions about lighting systems using light emitting diodes (LEDs). Lighting Answers: LED Lighting Systems helps practitioners understand the differences between LEDs and other conventional light sources, as well as some of their relevant performance characteristics. Key issues that are important in understanding the effective use of LEDs in lighting applications, including electrical performance, thermal performance, and optical performance are described. This publication should be useful to any practitioner who wants to use LED systems effectively in lighting applications.

Introduction

Light emitting diodes (LEDs) were first developed in the 1960s, but only in the past decade have LEDs had sufficient intensity for use in more than a handful of lighting applications (Stringfellow and Craford 1997), and specifiers are confronted with an increasing number of lighting products that incorporate LEDs for certain applications. Primarily, these applications have taken advantage of the characteristics of LEDs that have made them most suitable for indication, not illumination (Bierman 1998).

 

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