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ENERGY STAR® Durability Testing

ENERGY STAR logoSince the inception of the ENERGY STAR® program, the LRC has served as a technical advisor to the US Environmental Protection Agency on the revision of its residential light fixture specification. One of the major advantages of ENERGY STAR-labeled residential light fixtures is the "durability" of the products. "Durability" in this case does not refer to ability to withstand physical abuse, but rather the continued functioning of the lamp/ballast system several years after installation. Durability of fluorescent lamp fixtures is expected to be affected by thermal operating conditions, and by electrical compatibility between lamp and ballast.

Because customers expect durability of energy-efficient products to be high, premature failures can create barriers to the penetration of these energy efficient products in the market, as well as create a poor impression of the quality of all ENERGY STAR products.

Goals:
  1. Develop a simple testing method for "durability" to reduce likelihood of premature failures of ENERGY STAR light fixtures
  2. Build industry consensus on proposed testing method
  3. Perform pilot testing to fine-tune proposed testing method

The following "poster" describes the goals and status of the Durability project as of May 2002:

The following status reports were forwarded to ENERGY STAR® luminaire manufacturers and other parties interested in the development of a Durability testing procedure for ENERGY STAR® luminaires. The initial dispatch was sent in early May, with follow up editions every 4-6 weeks:

The following presentations were made at the recent industry roundtable, held at the Lighting Research Center on September 20, 2002:

The following is the final report summarizing the research results:

The following information was presented at the Dallas Roundtable, June 23, 2003.




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