Lighting Research Center Lighting Research Center
Educational Opportunities
Educational Opportunities

Graduate Education

MS in Lighting: Related research projects

Students in the Master of Science in Lighting program will undertake unique research or design projects under the guidance of a faculty advisor. Some examples of recent student projects include:

Evaluation of OLED and Edge-lit LED Lighting Panels

In this solid-state lighting (SSL) research project, the optical and lighting properties of area-type light sources, including OLED and edge-lit LED technologies, were investigated to define technology and human factors requirements. The study explored how the brightness and discomfort glare of OLED and edge-lit LED lighting panels were perceived by human subjects. The larger goal of this project, now underway, is to develop a scientific metric that can be used to accurately predict the human perception of lighting quality, specifically the lighting uniformity of a large-area lighting panel and its perceptual glare rating.

Remote Monitoring of LED System Performance

Advanced LED technologies, their associated controls, and now their connection to the Internet of Things (IoT), are allowing new possibilities in lighting that a generation ago were simply not possible. In this SSL research project, the goal was to develop effective, real-time monitoring of system performance, providing the means to estimate the remaining useful life of an LED lighting system. The study included investigations into the parameters and data-driven methods that can signal the impending failure of an LED lighting system and predict the remaining time until failure. This work coincides with other research in the areas of communications protocols and wireless data transfer, as part of the LRC's larger study of IoT connected lighting.

Lighting Patterns for Healthy Buildings

Older adults in long-term care facilities often spend their days and nights in dimly-lit rooms with minimal time spent outdoors. The constant, unvarying dim light found in many long-term care facilities means that older adults are not experiencing the robust daily patterns of light and dark that synchronize the body's circadian clock to local sunrise and sunset. The goal of this design project was to create a portfolio of lighting patterns to help lighting and healthcare professionals to select and place luminaires to support circadian health and wellbeing, while supporting the vision and orientation needs of older adults. The patterns are based upon the 24-hour lighting scheme for older adults proposed by LRC Professor Mariana Figueiro, which recommends cycled electric lighting that provides high circadian stimulus (CS) levels for daytime activities and low CS for evening hours, along with good lighting for visibility, and nightlights to provide horizontal/vertical cues to improve postural control and stability.

Impact of Lighting Conditions on Performance, Sleepiness, and Mood

In this light & health research project, participants spent 8 hours per day for 5 consecutive days in: (1) daylight, (2) high CCT electric light, and (3) dim light. The daylight and high CCT light provided high CS levels while the dim light provided low CS levels. Performance tests monitoring reaction time, memory, and accuracy measures were administered daily. Sleepiness ratings and self-reports of mood were collected, along with sleep logs. Results show reduced sleepiness in high CS lighting conditions. Performance measures show a trend toward a greater decrement over the course of the week when subjects were deprived from daytime circadian light. Mood remained better over the week in daylight than in dim light. Self-reported sleep duration increased over the course of the week. Overall results clearly indicate reduced sleepiness and improved mood for subjects receiving high CS levels during the day, but the impact of light on performance remains elusive.


 
 


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